Born from a Kickstarter campaign, veteran explorer Mike Harris Sr. and filmmaker Rich Martini have joined forces to examine the evidence that Amelia Earhart was on Saipan after she disappeared. They've been joined by a team of professionals from across the spectrum and are backed by a number of individuals with a desire to know the truth.
Stay tuned for more information...

Wednesday

Eyewitnesses who claim they saw Amelia Earhart on Saipan


This is an edited clip of the footage that Mike Harris and I shot while on Saipan. 

 Included are new eyewitnesses who claim they or their relatives saw Amelia Earhart after she disappeared in 1937. There's more info and details below but this clip dovetails with the recent reports of finding pieces of her plane on Mili Atoll. Dick Spink and Les Kinney (Dick found the new pieces on Mili, Les is an investigator with nearly 30 years of investigative experience) are on their way to Saipan to survey where her body was found by US Forces. We wish them the best of luck.

 People may not like what these folks are saying - that Amelia was arrested and incarcerated in prison, that she was buried on Saipan, her body recovered, her plane and briefcase found, her plane was destroyed and buried by US forces - but important to remember these are eyewitness accounts. From US Marines, US war veterans, and people on Saipan who are amused by people who show up without any knowledge of the island.

 Saipan was claimed by Germany, sold to Spain, then became Japanese, and was part of Japan territory until 1944. (It was then run by the CIA until 1963, and is now US territory, so when you land at the airport it says "Welcome to the US." No different than Puerto Rico. So when her plane was picked up from Mili Atoll by the Japanese in 1937, according to these reports, it was taken to Japanese territory, where their Naval Headquarters was located. (Much the way Pearl Harbor was considered US territory, even though it was yet to be a state in 1941.)

 According to these eyewitness reports, Amelia was incarcerated on Japanese territory, in a Japanese cell by the Japanese authorities. Her briefcase was found by US Marine Robert Wallack, her plane was found on Aslito airfield by US Marines in June of 44, and US Marine E. Julious Nabers under command of Lewis Wallace, decoded the messages that it had been found and was ordered to guard it. He says he guarded the plane on Aslito for 24 hours then decoded messages the military was going to fly it, and eventually destroy it. Other veterans (in this footage) saw it, and eventually watched as it was destroyed under orders from the Navy Dept. The plane was buried on the runway, which is now an international airfield. However, we have information as to where that location is, and have gotten the permits to survey the airfield. We plan on returning to do just that.

 I've been involved in this search since 1988, Mike Harris has been involved since the early 80's, and Les Kinney since around that time as well.  On behalf of Dick Spink, forensic aviation expert Jim Hayton, Les Kinney and Mike Harris (and the others who have contributed and participated) -  I'd say we all have one goal in common - to reveal whatever the truth may be about what happened to her.  We may not all appear in the various news articles regarding the latest "find" or "discovery" but we've all contributed to these revelations in our own personal way. Some of us have more "shoe leather in the game" than others, but at the end of the day it's not about who we are; it's about who she was.

Stay tuned for more details.


Thursday

Nice article about Doug Westfall's book on AE

Here's a nice article about Douglas Westfall's book that focuses on AE's final journey.

Article link here:


New Amelia Earhart footage surfaces
Albert Bresnik/AFP

New Amelia Earhart footage surfaces

When Amelia Earhart took off from southern California in 1937 on her ill-fated around-the-globe flight, a photographer documented the journey’s start. But the world was unaware, until this week, that a home movie was also made as she prepared for her expedition.
A publisher has released a grainy but well-preserved 3.5-minute film, which it says depicts the legendary aviatrix climbing aboard her plane the day before she departed on a trip that led to her disappearance over the Pacific six weeks later.

The clip does little to solve one of aviation’s enduring riddles in which Earhart, 39, and navigator Fred Noonan, 44, vanished as they were flying from Papua New Guinea to Howland Island on July 2, 1937, near the end of her quest to become the first woman to circumnavigate the globe by plane.

But it provides new images of the pilot, shortly before a disappearance that has entranced aviators and historians for decades. The film is believed to have been shot by John Bresnik, who tagged along with his brother Albert Bresnik, Earhart’s official photographer, to the Burbank airfield, where Earhart inspected her Lockheed 10 Electra.

Author and historian Douglas Westfall of The Paragon Agency, which is publishing the film clip Amelia Earhart’s Last Photo Shoot along with a book of the same name, said he was approached a decade ago by John Bresnik’s son, who revealed he had a potentially historic 16mm film that his father had kept in his office for half a century.

When the elder Bresnik died, the son kept the film untouched for 20 years, until Westfall coaxed him to let him make a digital copy.
“It’s a remarkable piece of history and it shows Amelia playing to the camera, playing to the audience and enjoying herself before she leaves,” said Westfall, about the soundless, black-and-white footage that shows Earhart posing for the camera in a stylish trousers-and-sweater outfit. “Looking at her – I mean, how many of those are you going to get in a lifetime?” Purchasers of the book will receive a downloadable copy of the film clip.

The photographs from the May 20, 1937 shoot, perhaps most notably the one of a smiling Earhart leaning against the tail of her Lockheed, have been seen by millions. But history is “blessed” to have a moving-picture account of the day as well, Westfall said.
Bresnik’s son eventually gave the film to Westfall, who said talks are under way for the film to be kept at an archive or museum.
Earhart’s trip continues to fascinate...


Here's Douglas Westfall's website and links for the book of these rare photos:

Tuesday

Typhoon on Saipan

Thoughts and prayers to all our friends on Saipan.  Hope everyone is safe and Saipan gets back on her feet as soon as possible.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/saipan-typhoon-soudelor_55bf338ae4b0b23e3ce32c16

'State Of Disaster' Declared After Typhoon Soudelor Slams Saipan

"Waking up the next day and seeing all the damage was heartbreaking."

Saipan endured severe damage after Typhoon Soudelor passed through the island late Sunday night with maximum sustained winds of 105 miles per hour and gusts of up to 120 miles per hour.
Soudelor, which hours earlier had been upgraded from a tropical storm to a Category 1-equivalent typhoon, made a direct hit on Saipan, destroying buildings, downing trees and power lines and flooding the island's power plant, according to Pacific News Center.
After conditions subsided Monday morning, Ralph Torres, acting governor for the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, declared "a state of disaster and significant emergency" for Saipan, the largest island of the U.S. Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.
Most of Saipan is currently without water and power, according to local news stations. Officialsdo not know when it will be restored.
Brad Ruszala, a spokesman for the Commonwealth Utilities Corporation, told a radio show in Guam that "a huge amount of our infrastructure is just gone."
"All these power poles snapped in half [have] fallen into buildings crossing over the road. We've also had some damage to our power plants," said Ruszala. "We haven't been able to assess that completely yet... but right now we're not gonna have power for some time.”
The U.S. Coast Guard also confirmed that 500 gallons of diesel fuel had spilled into the port of Saipan and that thousands of gallons of gasoline had leaked from a storage tank. The USCG Sector Guam is in Saipan to coordinate and assist with response efforts.

Thursday

The latest eyewitnesses who saw Earhart on Saipan

This is an edited clip of the footage that Mike Harris and I shot while on Saipan. 

 Included are new eyewitnesses who claim they or their relatives saw Amelia Earhart after she disappeared in 1937. There's more info and details below but this clip dovetails with the recent reports of finding pieces of her plane on Mili Atoll. Dick Spink and Les Kinney (Dick found the new pieces on Mili, Les is an investigator with nearly 30 years of investigative experience) are on their way to Saipan to survey where her body was found by US Forces. We wish them the best of luck.

 People may not like what these folks are saying - that Amelia was arrested and incarcerated in prison, that she was buried on Saipan, her body recovered, her plane and briefcase found, her plane was destroyed and buried by US forces - but important to remember these are eyewitness accounts. From US Marines, US war veterans, and people on Saipan who are amused by people who show up without any knowledge of the island.

 Saipan was claimed by Germany, sold to Spain, then became Japanese, and was part of Japan territory until 1944. (It was then run by the CIA until 1963, and is now US territory, so when you land at the airport it says "Welcome to the US." No different than Puerto Rico. So when her plane was picked up from Mili Atoll by the Japanese in 1937, according to these reports, it was taken to Japanese territory, where their Naval Headquarters was located. (Much the way Pearl Harbor was considered US territory, even though it was yet to be a state in 1941.)

 According to these eyewitness reports, Amelia was incarcerated on Japanese territory, in a Japanese cell by the Japanese authorities. Her briefcase was found by US Marine Robert Wallack, her plane was found on Aslito airfield by US Marines in June of 44, and US Marine E. Julious Nabers under command of Lewis Wallace, decoded the messages that it had been found and was ordered to guard it. He says he guarded the plane on Aslito for 24 hours then decoded messages the military was going to fly it, and eventually destroy it. Other veterans (in this footage) saw it, and eventually watched as it was destroyed under orders from the Navy Dept. The plane was buried on the runway, which is now an international airfield. However, we have information as to where that location is, and have gotten the permits to survey the airfield. We plan on returning to do just that.

 I've been involved in this search since 1988, Mike Harris has been involved since the early 80's, and Les Kinney since around that time as well.  On behalf of Dick Spink, forensic aviation expert Jim Hayton, Les Kinney and Mike Harris (and the others who have contributed and participated) -  I'd say we all have one goal in common - to reveal whatever the truth may be about what happened to her.  We may not all appear in the various news articles regarding the latest "find" or "discovery" but we've all contributed to these revelations in our own personal way. Some of us have more "shoe leather in the game" than others, but at the end of the day it's not about who we are; it's about who she was.

Stay tuned for more details.


Tuesday

The Daily Mail investigates the latest reports from Dick Spink and Les Kinney

To recap:


Dick Spink is the school teacher from Seattle we've become pals with.  He and Mike Harris and Les Kinney took a trip to Mili Atoll this past spring and came back with more artifacts.  I've spoken at length with Les about some of his research, he's spot on and corrected me in a number of areas.  I'm fond of saying "we're just trying to get at the truth" so I appreciate it when someone who's done the research can cite chapter and verse of what's really going on.

But pretty much, everything we reported - her coming down in Mili, her plane being taken by the Japanese aboard a ship, Bilimon Amaron meeting her aboard the ship (Mike Harris shot that original footage), AE and Fred being taken to Saipan and incarcerated.  CBS newsman Fred Goerner reported a number of accurate details, including her dysentery (which Les believes she died from.)  As I acknowledged, people's memories are not sacrosanct, so reports from Saipan of when and where events happened are estimates at best.

But we know she was incarcerated.  We know she died on Saipan.  We know her plane was found at Aslito. We know her plane was burned by US forces. We know her briefcase was recovered. We know that her body (or part of it) was exhumed.  All of these details have both eyewitnesses, some alive, some dead, and all of them now have corroborating evidence either in the form of documents or of eyewitness footage.

Why did the US not try to rescue her once they knew she had been arrested?  Why did the Japanese not trumpet that they had caught a "spy" - something she may or may not have been, but there were two Fairchild Aerial surveillance cameras put into her plane.  We can't answer those questions, but I believe they're beside the point.  First it's important to examine what happened.  Then it's important to examine how it happened. Then it's important to examine why it happened.

We have both the what and how.  In a few weeks, Parker and Alcoa will release their report based on the pieces that Dick Spink found, that Jim Hayton has verified from his professional opinion, that Les Kinney has found and delivered to them the actual alloy document that is from the original specs on her plane, that Mike Harris got original footage of islanders back in the 1980's, that I got footage of US Marines who found her briefcase and plane, and most recently, got more reports from Saipan from people who claim they saw her there after 1937.  It is all coming together, and soon - it will be in a news story near you.



EXCLUSIVE: Are these bits of metal proof that Amelia Earhart died after being captured by the Japanese on remote Pacific atoll – and the U.S. government KNEW but covered it up? 

  • Earhart and navigator Fred Noonan have not been heard of since July 1937 when they took off from New Guinea on 30th leg of round the world flight
  • But two investigators hope the mystery could be at an end within weeks
  • They believe they have two vital bits of evidence proving they landed in the Marshall Islands that day
  • If correct, it could prove they died while in the hands of the Japanese military - and that the U.S. government decided hero pilot was 'expendable'
Compelling new evidence found among the jagged coral of a tiny North Pacific island could be the key to finally unravelling the mystery of exactly what happened to U.S. aviator Amelia Earhart after she disappeared almost 80 years ago.
The corroding pieces of metal, discovered on the Mili atoll in the Marshall Islands, are currently being analysed to find out if they are the wheel well trim and dust cover from Amelia’s Lockheed Electra plane, which disappeared over the Pacific in 1937, while she and her navigator Fred Noonan were attempting to fly around the globe.
The two men behind the find believe that they are in possession of another piece of tantalising evidence that they claim proves she and her companion were captured by the Japanese and died while in their hands.
But by far the most incendiary allegation they make is that the U.S. government knew of the fate of Earhart and Noonan but did nothing to help them and then kept the dark secret for 78 years.

Scroll down for video 
Mystery: Amelia Earhart and her navigator Fred Noonan had made it most of the way around the world when they disappeared in July 1937 - sparking an enduring hunt to get to the bottom of what happened
Mystery: Amelia Earhart and her navigator Fred Noonan had made it most of the way around the world when they disappeared in July 1937 - sparking an enduring hunt to get to the bottom of what happened
Off course: One of the theories is that they landed on the coral shore of a small atoll in the Marshall Islands - a theory Dick Spink (pictured on the island) and Les Kinney hope to prove after finding a piece of metal
Off course: One of the theories is that they landed on the coral shore of a small atoll in the Marshall Islands - a theory Dick Spink (pictured on the island) and Les Kinney hope to prove after finding a piece of metal
Discovery: Two sleuths who have dedicated years to solving the mystery believe the circular piece of metal,  left, is a dust cover from the wheel hub of Earhart's plane. It is now with experts who are analysing its authenticity
Discovery: Two sleuths who have dedicated years to solving the mystery believe the circular piece of metal,  left, is a dust cover from the wheel hub of Earhart's plane. It is now with experts who are analysing its authenticity
The fate of Earhart has been the subject of endless worldwide speculation in books, movies, TV specials and has brought numerous researchers into the vast Pacific looking for vital clues.
But the men behind these latest extraordinary claims hope their discoveries will end the speculation once and for all - and within a matter of weeks.
Les Kinney and Dick Spink are convinced a skinny piece of metal and another small, circular piece of metal - which are currently being analysed by the companies which built Earhart's plane - is actually the trim and dust cover from the aircraft's landing gear, which they say broke off when it smashed along the rough coral shore at Mili at about 10am on July 2.
If it is proven to be part of Earhart's Lockheed Electra 10E it means they were more than 850 miles from Howland Island, their next scheduled refuelling stop when they disappeared.
It also puts them 2,000 miles from the spot in the sea where other Earhart sleuths believe the plane, having run out of fuel, crashed on that same morning.
But more than that, if the plane landed on Mili - as Kinney and Spink are convinced it must have - it lends credence to speculation that the doomed adventurers fell into the hands of the Japanese, who just five years later would be engaged in all-out war with the Americans.
Opening doors: If it does prove to be part of the Lockhead Electra 10E (pictured with Earhart in 1937), it will cause people to relook at a number of other theories - including what happened next to the adventurers
Opening doors: If it does prove to be part of the Lockhead Electra 10E (pictured with Earhart in 1937), it will cause people to relook at a number of other theories - including what happened next to the adventurers
Destroyed: A close up of the wheel, which is thought to have been torn up as they landed on the coral
Destroyed: A close up of the wheel, which is thought to have been torn up as they landed on the coral
Clues: Spink with the plastic replica of the dust cover that was found on Mili Atoll and a copy of the wheel hub it would have attached to
Clues: Spink with the plastic replica of the dust cover that was found on Mili Atoll and a copy of the wheel hub it would have attached to
It has long been rumoured that the 39-year-old pilot and her navigator were captured by Japanese troops who were setting up military bases in the Pacific. Those troops were said to be on board a transport ship heading to the island of Saipan, where Japan had a large military base.
There are those, with Spink and Kinney among them, who claim the Lockheed was put on carts used for transporting ammunition and then loaded on to a barge that was towed to the island of Jaluit. There, it is presumed the plane was lifted onto the ship and then taken to Saipan. 
Kinney and Spink, part of a team who travelled to the Mili island last January, found the remains of three of the ammunition cart's metal wheels and axles, while the wooden tops rotted away years ago.
Kinney said: 'The rails were moved and reset until the Japanese reached the lagoon side of the beach where the plane was loaded onto a small barge with the help of 40 locals'. 
They did not die as claimed by the government and the Navy when the Electra plunged into the Pacific - they died while in Japanese captivity on the island of Saipan in the Northern Marianas. 
Amelia Earhart's fourth cousin Wally  
Suspected by the Japanese of being spies for the Americans, some claim the pair were held on Saipan until they died despite the lack of physical evidence, with the cause of their deaths the subject of further controversy.
In 2009, Wally Earhart, Amelia’s fourth cousin, said the U.S. government continued to perpetrate a ‘massive cover-up’ about the couple and insisted they had died in Japanese custody.
‘They did not die as claimed by the government and the Navy when the Electra plunged into the Pacific - they died while in Japanese captivity on the island of Saipan in the Northern Marianas,’ said Mr Earhart, who did not reveal his sources.
He said that on Saipan, Noonan was beheaded by the Japanese and Earhart died soon after from dysentery and other ailments.
Kinney and many other Earhart enthusiasts believe her plane was dumped into a giant pit in Saipan along with Japanese aircraft by US marines in the aftermath of World War Two. The pit is under a runway that is still being used. One researcher is trying to get permission to unearth the planes.
Then there was Thomas E. Devine, who served in a postal Army unit who spoke of a letter from the daughter of a Japanese police official who claimed her father was responsible for Amelia’s execution. 
Photographs have also emerged over the years claiming to show Amelia in captivity - but these have been found to be fraudulent or to have been taken before she began her flight.
There are also the claims of U.S. troops who landed on Saipan after the war went on to insist they found a safe which, after it was blown open, was found to contain a briefcase filled with Amelia’s flying documents. Another claim, more dubious, tells of the discovery of her documents in a cave on Saipan.
Possibilities: If the duo are right, Earhart and Noonan were more than 850 miles off course. They were meant to land on Howland Island (centre), although others suspect they could have crashed nearer Gardner Island (bottom, far right). It would give credence to the idea they were taken to Japanese base at Saipan (top left)
Possibilities: If the duo are right, Earhart and Noonan were more than 850 miles off course. They were meant to land on Howland Island (centre), although others suspect they could have crashed nearer Gardner Island (bottom, far right). It would give credence to the idea they were taken to Japanese base at Saipan (top left)
Route: Earhart was trying to become the first woman to fly around the world - starting in Oakland on May 20
Route: Earhart was trying to become the first woman to fly around the world - starting in Oakland on May 20
Not impossible: Many said it would be impossible to reach Mili in Earhart's plane, but Spink claims this fuel report proves it would have been possible - lending more credence to their claims
Not impossible: Many said it would be impossible to reach Mili in Earhart's plane, but Spink claims this fuel report proves it would have been possible - lending more credence to their claims
Eyewitnesses: There are also a number of eyewitness accounts, including islanders who said they watched Earhart land to the right of where the research boat (circled) is moored
Eyewitnesses: There are also a number of eyewitness accounts, including islanders who said they watched Earhart land to the right of where the research boat (circled) is moored
More hints: These wheels could have been used by the Japanese to take the plane off the island - it would have originally had a wooden platform in the middle, but it has rotten away
More hints: These wheels could have been used by the Japanese to take the plane off the island - it would have originally had a wooden platform in the middle, but it has rotten away
But how would all this have been kept quiet for some many years? 
Kinney and Spink believe politics, national security and even Japanese loss of face all play their part in the failure for Earhart's fate to be exposed by the U.S. and Japan.
‘At the time, cultural attitudes in Japan placed great emphasis on “saving face”,’ Kinney told MailOnline. ‘The Japanese aversion to being humiliated would not allow an announcement Earhart had been found even if only a few days had elapsed since her discovery on Mili atoll.
‘No less a factor was the rise of Japanese militancy. In the 1930s, the Japanese military considered the United States an enemy and would have quickly concluded, whether it was true or not, that Amelia Earhart had been sent on a spy mission.’
That mission, he said, would likely have been an assessment of whether the Japanese were militarily fortifying the Marshall Islands.
What's more, he believes the U.S. knew within a few weeks that Earhart and Noonan were in the custody of the Japanese but could do nothing.
‘If they had, the Japanese would have known the U.S. had broken their closely-guarded military and diplomatic codes. The U.S. decided Earhart would become expendable.’ 
But while some will be quick to dismiss this in particular as the wild rantings of a conspiracy theorist, Kinney, a former U.S. Federal law enforcement agent, believes he has one more piece of evidence in his possession which will prove his claim beyond a shadow of a doubt.
Kinney said that after spending hundreds of hours combing national archives in the US, he unearthed one vital document that ‘would be tough for the government to refute.’ 
He is unwilling to make its contents public yet until his remaining investigations are complete. 
Prisoners: Earhart, pictured arriving in Southampton, is said to have been taken from Mili Atoll by the Japanese, who - in some accounts - executed Noonan before she died of dysentery on Saipan
Prisoners: Earhart, pictured arriving in Southampton, is said to have been taken from Mili Atoll by the Japanese, who - in some accounts - executed Noonan before she died of dysentery on Saipan
Artifacts: These are other pieces of metal found on Mili. Most have been discounted as not coming from Earhart's plane, but the long piece of metal on the left may be significant
Artifacts: These are other pieces of metal found on Mili. Most have been discounted as not coming from Earhart's plane, but the long piece of metal on the left may be significant
Dedicated: Spink, in his workshop in Washington State, has spent thousands of dollars to prove his theory
Dedicated: Spink, in his workshop in Washington State, has spent thousands of dollars to prove his theory
Kinney has also relied heavily on an account of the discovery of what is said to have been Amelia’s briefcase on Saipan - a discovery made in July 1944 by U.S. Marine Robert Wallack.
After American troops landed on Saipan, Wallack was part of a team ordered to blow up a Japanese safe.
Inside, he has claimed, he found a briefcase that contained Amelia’s navigational gear, her passport, maps and other personal documents. He gave the briefcase to a high-ranking naval officer on the beach.
‘In my opinion,’ Kinney told MailOnline, ‘the briefcase was sent back to Washington, D.C., some time in late July or August of 1944. It most likely went to the White House and then on to some secure storage facility of the Navy. There is a good chance it later was destroyed.’
It was also in 1944, he says, that two Marine privates, on orders from a watchful Marine Intelligence officer, dug up a grave outside an old Catholic cemetery on Saipan. The skeletal remains of two people were thrown into a canister. 
The Japanese would have known the U.S. had broken their closely-guarded military and diplomatic codes. The U.S. decided Earhart would become expendable.
Les Kinney 
‘When the two privates asked what they were doing, the intelligence officer replied “Have you ever heard of Amelia Earhart?”’
Kinney added that in 1968, four researchers from Cleveland dug up the same grave and unearthed 189 bone fragments. Years later, with the advent of DNA, the researchers tried to retrieve the bones from the archaeological museum where they had been stored - but they were missing. 
‘Officials at the museum have no idea what happened to the bones,’ said Kinney.
Kinney, who has been investigating the Earhart mystery for 27 years, dismisses the competing theory that Amelia crashed on Gardner Island, now known as Nikumaroro, while trying to reach her intended destination on Howland Island.
He insisted ‘she didn’t make it - for whatever reason, Earhart missed Howland island from the west and continued in a north-easterly direction.’
Many say the distance to Mili would have been impossible for the Electra to cover.
But Kinney and Spink, a 53-year-old American science teacher who has spent thousands of dollars of his own money investigating the Earhart disappearance, believe it was possible. 
They insist that because Earhart had extra fuel tanks on board the plane she had ample fuel to make it - and Kinney has uncovered a Lockheed fuel study which he said proves she could have made it.
And his belief is backed up by contemporary accounts from the islands that they have collected on their visit. 
Kinney told MailOnline: ‘After leaving Lae, New Guinea, Earhart must have landed at Mili atoll just after 10am local time. The tidal charts for that time and date indicate the tide was beginning to recede.
‘Two Marshallese eyewitnesses to Earhart’s landing, fishing not far away, said two people left the plane in a small yellow boat.’
They add that numerous people in the Marshall Islands have told them of seeing the two fliers on Mili island before they were captured by the Japanese and taken on board the tramp steamer, the Koshu Maru.
The damaged Electra plane was loaded onto a barge and towed behind the Koshu Maru to two other atolls before mooring at Saipan.   
Expendable: Some people also believe the Americans knew Earhart (pictured 1937) had been taken prisoner
Expendable: Some people also believe the Americans knew Earhart (pictured 1937) had been taken prisoner
Abandoned: Despite being a hero, she was left to her fate as the Japanese believed she was a spy, it's claimed
Abandoned: Despite being a hero, she was left to her fate as the Japanese believed she was a spy, it's claimed
Spink said he had been told by many people that local Bilimon Amram, who was half-Japanese and working as a medic on Jaluit atoll - one of the atolls the Koshu Maru stopped at to refuel - had claimed he treated Noonan for a leg injury.
‘Everyone told me Bilimon bandaged Fred’s infected leg,’ said Spink, accounts that also convinced him that the two Americans had been picked up on Mili Atoll. 
What's more, the men and other members of the Mili expedition found a number of pieces of metal they thought could have been part of a plane - discoveries made more compelling by the fact there were no other planes on the small island and no air battles had been fought overhead or close by.
But one of these pieces, thought to be from an auxiliary power unit, has since been discounted.
So the two men and the rest of the investigating team now pin their hopes on two remaining pieces. The first is the corroded circle they hope may have been the dust shield that fitted over the brake assembly of a GoodYear wheel.
The second is the thin piece of metal they believe is part of the wheel well of the plane.  
It is being tested, along with other pieces, by metals giant Alcoa and aviation firm Parker Aerospace who are comparing their chemical elements to those of contemporary aircraft. 
The official held belief is that the aircraft is 'on the bottom of the Pacific', 18,000 feet down but close to Howland, said Tom Crouch, senior curator at the U.S. National Air and Space Museum. 
In the meantime, Spink still clings to his memory of the extraordinary moment that led to today’s possible breakthrough in the Earhart mystery - a moment during a party with friends in the Marshall Islands.
‘Didn’t Amelia Earhart disappear in this part of the world?’ he asked.
‘Yes,’ a local man answered. ‘She landed on our island and my uncle watched her for two days.’ 
* At dawn on August 4, 1944, the 2,295-ton Koshu Maru, carrying air base supplies, was hit by four US torpedoes in the Makassar Strait and sank immediately with the loss of 273 passengers, 28 crew members and gunners and 1,239 Javanese labourers. 


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3139044/Are-bits-metal-proof-Amelia-Earhart-died-captured-Japanese-remote-Pacific-atoll-U-S-government-KNEW-covered-up.html#ixzz3eb9qfcJj
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Special Thanks!!!

We've been blessed with great help from the people of Saipan... just a small sample:

Aircraft Recovery Associates Appreciation List


Bruce Bateman


Estella Cabrera


Rose Callier


Maria Castro


Dave Dougherty


Tan Escolastica


Jerry Facey


Don Farrell


Mike Flemming


Robert Hunter


Chuck Jordan


Jessica Jordan


Connie Kaufer


Jerry Kramer


Sam McPhetres


Andy Miller


Peter Muna


Manny Muna


Chris Neltner


Joanne Nichols


Lino Olopai


Mark Robertson


Scott Russell


Robert Rustin


David M. Sablan


Jack Salas


Vincente Santos


Jeff Schorr


Ron Smith


Marilyn Swift


Joe Weaver


Former Governor Ben Fitial


American Memorial Park


Governor Eloy Inos


Divers in Paradise


Saipan Lt. Governor Jude Hofschneider


Docomo Pacific


Dept of Environmental Quality


GPPC, Inc.


Historic Preservation Office


Godfather's


NMI Council for the Humanities


Hermans Bakery


NMI Dept of Fish and Wildlife


Our pals from Katmandu at Java Joe's


NMI Dept of Land and Natural Resources


Microl Toyota Rent a Car


Minimax Dive Shop


Pacific Quick Print


Round Two


Seafix, Inc


SDA Dental Clinic


Shirley's Coffee Shop


Tribes


Wild Bill's


Ron Barrineau


Rotary Club of Saipan


Hugh Muscat


Marianas Variety


Saipan Tribune


KSPN


IT&E


Tomasa Blas


Josephine Blanco Akiyama


John Blanco


Jared Abraham


Sunim


Andrew Bryce


Douglas Bryce


Juan Diaz


Ray Kumoi Guerrero


Thomas Comacho


Herbert Rosario


Ernie Arriola


Stanley Torres


David Rosario


Delores Katamane


Ray Bermudes


Cat Perry


Katori Matsumoto


Mike Fleming


Eddie Williams


Joe Salas


And many others we spoke to us on and off camera.. thank you!!!


Eyewitness Accounts: Published

EYEWITNESS: THE AMELIA EARHART INCIDENT BY THOMAS E DEVINE WITH RICHARD M DALEY

Pg 40. “Glancing out on the runway ramp.. an area not the main part of Aslito Field, but an extended arm of the airstrip at the southwest corner… Near an embankment was (AE’s plane). (LATER) .. a muffled explosion at Aslito Field erupted into a large flash fire… I crouched and crawled toward the airfield. When I could see what was burning, I was aghast! The twin engine plane was engulfed in flames! I could not see anyone by the light of the fire… in July 1944.”

THE SEARCH FOR AMELIA EARHART BY FRED GOERNER

Goerner gathers dozens of eyewitnesses to Earhart’s incarceration and second hand info about her execution.

AMELIA EARHART: LAST FLIGHT

Amelia reveals she did not know Morse code (and neither did Fred Noonan)

AMELIA EARHART:HER LAST FLIGHT

By OLIVER KNAGSS

South African journalist gathers numerous eyewitnesses at Mili, Majuro and Jaluit. There is footage of these interviews, but it exists somewhere in Miami – still trying to locate the negative.

AMELIA EARHART: THE MYSTERY SOLVED By ELGEN M LONG AND MARIE K LONG

Elgen shows how the original plan devised by radio man Harry Manning was adhered to by the Coast Guard Itasca – they didn’t know Manning got off the plane in Hawaii and wasn’t on the electra. So 90% of all their communication was in Morse code – something neither AE or FN knew.

“WITH OUR OWN EYES – EYEWTINESSES TO THE FINAL DAYS OF AMELIA EARHART” MIKE CAMPBELL WITH THOMAS E DEVINE

PG 32. Robert Sosbe, 1st battalion 20th Marines, 4th marine division) Sosbe said he saw the Electra before and during its destruction) “on or about D+5 after our infantry had captured Alsito, the night before, then were driven off, only to capture it again, our Co was called up to fill a gap between our infantry and the 27th Army infantry. The trucks carrying us stopped off the opposite side of the runway from the hangars and tower about 3 to 5 hundred yds. This two engine airplane was pulled from the hangar to off the runway where it was engulfed in flames from one end to the other. I can still remember exactly the way it burned, how the frame and ribs because it was visible. It was about half dark. It burned approximately 15-30 minutes.”

Same page: a letter from Earskine Nabers: “I am seeking Marines who were placed on duty at Aslito to guard a padlocked hangar containing AE’s plane. The hangar was not one of those located along the runway. It was located near what may have been a Japanese administration building, and an unfinished hangar at the tarmac, in the southwest corner of the airfield.

The follow up letter (pg 33)

…”we had to get Col. Clarence R Wallace to sign all the messages that came through the message center.) Hq 8th moved back to bivouac area. I was dropped off at the Hangar for guard duty at the main road that went by west side of hangar. The road that went out to hangar, I was placed on the right side, just as it left the main road….

Pg 34 The best I can recall the plane was pulled on the field by a jeep.. the plane was facing north after the plane was parked and jeep moved. A plane came over real low and on the next pass he strafed the plane and it went up in a huge fireball. (We were sitting on the west side of the airfield about one hundred yards from the plane. We were on higher ground. As far as I remember, the (men) that pulled the plane on the field and us guys from H & S 8th were the only ones there.”

Pg 36 Marine Capt Earl Ford of Fallbrook, CA, artillery master sgt with 2nd Marines. Interview 6-7-88 by Paul Cook. “The aircraft was about 100 yards (from me) maybe less. We all saw it. No way we could miss it. A civilian twin engine. No way it was military. American aircraft in civil registration… some officers were saying it was Amelia’s… it had only two windows on the side, back here.”

Arthur Nash, Air Corps Corps, P47 group on Aslito. Claims he saw the plane on July 4, 1944 (book says 1945, must be a misprint based on following) pg 40:

“After landing on Isley.. at 2:30 pm, Japanese soldiers were running around the airstrip, one killed himself in the cockpit of a P47D with a grenade…” I slept fairly well (in the hangar) and (in the morning) wandered over to a large hole in the hangar wall facing the other hangar. The hangar floor and the area between the hangars was littered with debris, displace with siding from the hangars, maybe 65 yards apart, but close enough to get a good look at a familiar aircraft outside the other hangar. My eyesight was acute and what I saw was Amelia Earhart’s airplane!... the next morning I went over to see it but it was gone.”

Jerrell Chatham, 1st platoon, I company, 3rd regiment, 2nd marine deivions: “I was driving trucks .. on Saipan… when we went ashore I saw the hangar where Amelia Earhart’s plane was stored, I also saw the plane in the air. They told us not to go close to the airplane hangar and we did not…”

Pg 44: Howard Ferris, US Marines: “Sent to Saipan for guard dutey… an old hangar structure at end of a runway. This hangar was not large,.. small trees in front of big doors.. (then he recounts the same Marine argument that Devine and Nabers recount – where some Navy brass attempted to get in, but a Marine (Nabers) refused them entry.)” Howard was not present at the fire, but one of his buddies was. The buddy said a truck arrived with many gas cans and the guards saturated the entire hangar.. and it burned totally.

Pg 50 Robert Sowash, 23rd regiment 4th Marines Division: “I saw a plane in a building that was not a military plane.. I remember other Marines saying it was the same as Earhart’s. Later the place was cordoned off..”

Pete Leblanc, 121st Naval CB’s, 4th Marine division: “some of our guys were sneaking over towards the airfield to try and see (AE’s plane). We heard there were guards there. Then it was burned up later.”

AMELIA EARHART: LOST LEGEND - DONALD MOYER WILSON

Over 200 eyewitnesses as gathered by all the different authors with the various reports of her landing on Mili, being brought to Jaluit and incarcerated in Garapan prison.